Bob McNulty Shares How Trip Delivers Saves Restaurants Thousands While Giving Drivers A Serious Pay Rise

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Bob McNulty  
Yes. So here, here’s, here’s what you here’s the numbers, you got to go into the restaurant business itself. So if you say an average restaurant is delivering between 15 and 20 deliveries a day, and if he’s getting knocked around for eight to 16 bucks, but let’s just say it’s 12 to $14. Right? And just multiply that a day multiply it six times, you know if they’re open six days a week. I mean, you’re talking about 70, 80, 100 thousand dollars in delivery fees they’re saving with us. That makes a huge difference for a small mom and pop restaurant.

Neil Howe  
Yeah, I was gonna say okay, what kind of margins are restaurants running out because that’s going to take a huge chunk of their margin.

Bob McNulty 
Right, and that’s the whole thing, their food cost doesn’t really get covered when they start getting hammered like that. And that’s the problem. So our solution was a flat fee, crushed the pricing down, you know, and do all the other things we’re doing from a disruptive standpoint, that’s a SaaS business model. So there’s no fair split with the drivers, the drivers get 100% of the fare, we outline exactly what that means. So it’s there’s no hidden agenda with us. It’s just full transparency on every line item. So the consumer sees that the driver sees it, the restauranteur sees it. So there’s nothing left to wonder.

Neil Howe 
hmm. All right, so let’s move on to the drivers, I want to come back to the restaurants in a minute and find out how they can get signed up because I’m sure once they hear the savings that they can make, they’re going to want to know how they get signed up and how they can get started. But let’s talk about the drivers because I’m sure the drivers aren’t getting that, you know, 12 to $16 delivery fee that these delivery companies are charging right now.

Bob McNulty

No, they don’t I mean, they, they get a portion of that. And which is interesting, even the drivers can’t tell you what percent of that they’re getting. They don’t know, because they don’t see the full receipt. So that that in there lies a problem for the drivers. One of the things that we recognized early on is the drivers the backbone of this business model. So if they’re the backbone of the business model, and you need to think about how do we make things better for the driver, whether it’s, you know, a better pay model, or just recognition, you know, Hey, you guys are doing a great job. And not to say the other companies don’t do that they have recognition programs, too. But I think coupled with the business model itself, leaves the driver out in the cold a lot, you know, they need to be embraced for what they did, because in the scheme of things, drivers work really hard. I mean, if you’ve probably taken Uber’s, and lifts and all that stuff, and you’ve you know, been run all over the city and whatever, you can see how hard they work, you know, and they’re, they got to get you to your place and get onto another ride. So they’re making the cars moving, they need to be making money. And by us charging a flat fee, whether it’s $39.99 a month, or $99 a month to drive, they know exactly what their monthly spend is. So it’s not hard for them to figure out. The other thing we do for the drivers also in the restaurants, we issue each driver their own card processing. So they truly are independent. So the fees that they make, go directly from the consumer directly to them in their bank account, we don’t get in between the money. In other words, we don’t control it, they sign up with us they get issued a merchant account, just like the restaurants do. So the money gets to them, you know, pretty immediate, it’s not like they have to wait a day or two, it’s usually they set it out in batches every few hours.

Neil Howe 
Alright, let’s talk about that fee, because I’m sure that it would be a hiccup for some people listening if you are a driver for you know, Uber Eats or GrubHub you’re not accustomed to paying any kind of fee. But this is they are paying Trip Delivers to use the software. Tell me how that is different and how it is made up and they can ultimately make more money in this business model, rather than what they’re used to right now.

Bob McNulty 
Yeah, it’s again, it’s the same thing that the rideshare companies are doing but the drivers is they do it to restaurants. It’s a split commission. They don’t know what the value of the commission is. And you can go online and see that there’s a lot of conversation about is it 20% 25% whatever 30 40% they don’t know because they don’t see the end result of the ride fair. With us, they get 100% of the time and distance cancellation fee wait time and tip. So that makes up the rideshare ride fare. So with us on a third so let’s say you’re we call it a side hustle, but really a part-time driver, maybe you’re somebody that wants to drive on Friday nights, Saturdays and maybe a little bit on Sunday or something and if you average $8 to $10 before tips with us. There’s no obviously there’s no money taken out of that’s 100% for the driver, that same ride if it was you know for Uber or Lyft or any of the other rideshare guys that could be as much as 25 30% Okay, so if you take a call it a $40 monthly without that gives you 75 deliveries a month, you probably averaged with tip and everything 10 11, 12 bucks. So you know your gross is about 750 after you pay your $39.99, so you got a $40 bill on 750 bucks. So it’s supposed to probably something north of 200 to 300 bucks, that you would have paid in commissions to Uber or Lyft.

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Neil Howe

Neil Howe is a 3-time #1 Best Selling Author, Online Media Strategist and business radio talk show host. He covers the most Innovative Business Leaders in Small and Local Business helping them share their stories with the world.